Checklist for Website Credibility

A great website doesn’t make you a credible recruiter

But you won’t be credible without one. 

According to a Stanford University study, 75% of consumers make judgments on a company’s credibility based on the company’s website. Using these guidelines, review your current website to see how it measures up. If you’re missing a few, let’s talk about getting your website working for you.

  1.  Make it easy to verify the accuracy of the information on your site. You can build website credibility by providing third-party support (citations, references, source material) for information you present, especially if you link to this evidence. Even if people don’t follow these links, you’ve shown confidence in your material.
  2. Show there’s a real organization behind your site. Showing your website is for a legitimate organization will boost the site’s credibility. The easiest way to do this is by listing a physical address. Other features can also help, such as posting a photo of your offices or listing a membership with the chamber of commerce.
  3. Highlight the expertise in your organization and in the content and services you provide. Do you have experts on your team? Are your contributors or service providers authorities? Be sure to give their credentials. Are you affiliated with a respected organization? Make that clear. Conversely, don’t link to outside sites that are not credible. Your site becomes less credible by association.
  4. Show that honest and trustworthy people stand behind your site. The first part of this guideline is to show there are real people behind the site and in the organization. Next, find a way to convey their trustworthiness through images or text. For example, some sites post employee bios that tell about family or hobbies.
  5. Make it easy to contact you. A simple way to boost your site’s credibility is by making your contact information clear: phone number, physical address and email address.
  6. Design your site so it looks professional (or is appropriate for your purpose). People quickly evaluate a site by visual design alone. When designing your site, pay attention to layout, typography, images, consistency issues and more. The visual design should match the site’s purpose.
  7. Make your site easy to use—and useful. We’re squeezing two guidelines into one here. Research shows that sites win credibility points by being both easy to use and useful. Some site operators forget about users when they cater to their own company’s ego or try to show the dazzling things they can do with technology.
  8. Update your site’s content often (at least show it’s been reviewed recently). People assign more credibility to sites that show they have been recently updated or reviewed. A blog or news section is a great way to accomplish this. 
  9. Use restraint with any promotional content such as ads and offers. If possible, avoid having ads on your site. If you must have ads, clearly distinguish the sponsored content from your own. Avoid pop-up ads, unless you don’t mind annoying users and losing credibility. As for writing style, try to be clear, direct and sincere.
  10. Avoid errors of all types, no matter how small they seem. Typographical errors and broken links hurt a site’s credibility more than most people imagine. It’s also important to keep your site up and running.

Whether you are a niche recruiter or a large firm, Recruiters Websites can help you reach prospective clients and candidates by providing website design and developmentmarketing strategy, copywriting and custom content creationSEO services and custom API and application integrations.

Based on the “Stanford Guidelines for Web Credibility.” A Research Summary from the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab. Fogg, B.J. (May 2002). Stanford University.

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Emily Blattel

Emily brings more than 15 years of professional experience in public relations, advertising and marketing to Recruiters Websites, with a special emphasis on media relations, digital and social media strategy and implementation, content creation, internal communication, creative strategy and event planning.

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